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Maiko Tsutsumi is pathway leader for MA Designer Maker (MA Visual Arts), and Postgraduate Programme Director, Camberwell College of Arts.

Maiko studied Japanese lacquer work and woodcraft, and apprenticed to furniture makers in Kyoto in the early 1990s. She then moved to London in 1996 to study furniture design at the Royal College of Art. While working at designer Tomoko Azumi's t.n.a. design studio, she embarked on a practice based PhD The Poetics of Everyday Objects at Kingston University (supervised by Penny Sparke). The PhD, which was completed in 2007, investigated how design practitioners tacitly respond to the condition of material culture, and their products potentially embody and manifest the response collectively in material form.

Maiko co-curated an exhibition, Thingness, which explored the role materiality plays in production and the experience of art and design objects, and how these objects ‘materially’ embody narratives and meanings in contrast to symbolic representations. The exhibition was accompanied by a one-day symposium and a book published by Camberwell Press. The sequel of Thingness, Thingness: The Collection in 2013 featured selected objects from Camberwell Collection (ILEA collection), exploring the narrative potential of material objects. She co-curated with Eduardo Padilha, The Laundry Room for BalinHouseProjects (September/October 2012) - an exhibition/intervention in a disused communal laundry room, featuring Richard Wentworth and Michael Marriott. The book The Laundry Room was published by The Everyday Press in June 2013. Her latest curatorial project The Department of Repair (2015) was held at Camberwell Space.

In her studio practice, Maiko has been working on a series of small sculptures and objects for use that are inspired by the formative influence of ethnological collections.

Research interests: contemporary design/craft practice, practice as research, knowledge in practice, tacit knowledge, embedded knowledge,
object studies, materiality, and the 'thing-ness' of objects.